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Dan Crenshaw Made $100,000 In Book Royalties Last Year, Aided By GOP Group’s Big Purchase

By News Creatives Authors , in Billionaires , at January 1, 1970

With the help of a bulk purchase from a Republican political committee, Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-Texas) made more than $100,000 in book royalties last year, according to a financial disclosure he filed on Wednesday with the House clerk’s office.

In the two months after Crenshaw’s book came out in April 2020, the National Republican Congressional Committee bought $394,000 worth of what it simply called “books” from a Washington, D.C. retailer, records with the Federal Election Commission show. That book was Crenshaw’sPolitico reported in 2020, citing a party official. 

More than a year later, it appears the NRCC still has a supply: Autographed copies are available in exchange for donations of $45 or more. 

A leadership book, Crenshaw’s Fortitude: American Resilience in the Era of Outrage spent six weeks on the New York Times best-seller list last year, peaking at number five. 

Spokespeople for Crenshaw and the NRCC have not replied to inquiries.

Crenshaw has now disclosed hauling in at least $350,000 from book deals. He received a $125,000 advance from Javelin in 2019 and an advance for that same amount from Hachette in 2018. 

While House rules bar members from receiving book advances, Crenshaw signed his book deal before he became a congressperson, a spokesperson for Crenshaw previously told Forbes. 

Crenshaw submitted his financial disclosure report 12 days after the August 13 due date, which itself was an extension of the May 15 deadline. He amended his report the same day, having originally omitted the book royalties. 

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I took an unusual route to get here. In a past life, I worked as a travel and food writer, which is how I got the assignment in 2016 to cover the grand opening of the

I took an unusual route to get here. In a past life, I worked as a travel and food writer, which is how I got the assignment in 2016 to cover the grand opening of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., just a couple miles from my home. When Trump won the election and refused to divest his business, I stayed on the story, starting a newsletter called 1100 Pennsylvania (named after the hotel’s address) and contributed to Vanity Fair, Politico and NBC News. I’m still interested in Trump, but I’ve broadened my focus to follow the money connected to other politicians as well—both Republicans and Democrats.

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